Sunda Flying Lemur at Bukit Timah

The Sunda Flying Lemur (Galeopterus variegatus), also known as the Malayan Flying Lemur or Malayan Colugo, is a species of colugo found throughout South-East Asia. In Singapore, it can be found in the Central Catchment area.

At night when it is in search for food, it can glide across the forest canopy. This because it has a gliding membrane that connects from the neck, extending along the limbs to the tips of the fingers, toes and nails. Hence the name, flying lemur although it is neither can truly fly nor a true lemur.

During the day it is often found resting. I have seen this species previously at Lower Peirce.  This time around I manage to see it in February 2012 at Bukit Timah near the visitor centre. It was clinging on to a palm tree.

Sunda Flying Lemur

The flying lemur was clinging on the lower part of the palm tree, so it was easy to position myself closer to it. It’s looking warily at the people gathering to see it.

 

Sunda Flying Lemur

It decided that it needs to be up higher, so it started climbing. You can see just how flexible the membrane is.

 

Sunda Flying Lemur

As it climbs, particles fall down from the tree on the left side,  and you can now see it elongating it’s body further.

 

Sunda Flying Lemur

As it reaches the top, I walked to the side to photograph the other part of the animal. You can see why it was wary of human. It has a baby in it’s membrane’s fold, with it’s head jutting out in curiosity. The baby can take up to six month to be independent from the adult. During this time, it clings on for protection and food.

 

Further reading:
Encyclopedia of Life Online

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